Blog Page2019-06-17T23:32:42-06:00
2812, 2018

Yoga + Physical Therapy = Pain Relief

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Yoga can be enjoyed anytime and anywhere!

Most people don’t think of yoga as something that is connected to physical therapy. However, yoga is an effective way to manage a variety of conditions, maintaining flexibility and fostering movement. Yoga can be an important adjunct to physical therapy to relieve pain and aid in reducing the risk of injury.

Yoga is more than a means of relieving stress. It does relieve stress, but it is also an effective way to reduce high blood pressure, improve circulation and stimulate the immune system, and ease the pain in a variety of chronic conditions.

Yoga can be performed by individuals of any age and is particularly effective for people with neurological conditions and joint disease. It promotes better sleep and is beneficial for those engaged in programs for anger management, smoking cessation, and substance abuse. Yoga combined with physical therapy is a complete wellness solution. It is beneficial for rehabilitation, improving balance, coordination, and motor skills.

Yoga Spans Centuries

Yoga has been practiced for centuries and experts in different parts of the world have made minor modifications to the execution of yoga. However, the goal remains the same – to align the body and mind. Specific physical positions are used to benefit musculoskeletal health and posture and promote breathing control.

Benefits of Yoga

Most people don’t think of yoga as something that is connected to physical therapy. However, yoga is an effective way to manage a variety of conditions, maintaining flexibility and fostering movement. Yoga can be an important adjunct to physical therapy to relieve pain and aid in reducing the risk of injury.

Yoga is more than a means of relieving stress. It does relieve stress, but it is also an effective way to reduce high blood pressure, improve circulation and stimulate the immune system, and ease the pain in a variety of chronic conditions.

Yoga can be performed by individuals of any age and is particularly effective for people with neurological conditions and joint disease. It promotes better sleep and is beneficial for those engaged in programs for anger management, smoking cessation, and substance abuse. Yoga combined with physical therapy is a complete wellness solution. It is beneficial for rehabilitation, improving balance, coordination, and motor skills.

Yoga Spans Centuries

Yoga has been practiced for centuries and experts in different parts of the world have made minor modifications to the execution of yoga. However, the goal remains the same – to align the body and mind. Specific physical positions are used to benefit musculoskeletal health and posture and promote breathing control.

Yoga Poses, Benefits and History

One of the lesser known therapeutic advantages of yoga is its ability to affect mental and emotional health. These are necessary ingredients for successful recoveries and rehabilitation. Yoga aids in relieving anxiety and depression following injuries, during rehabilitation and prolonged recovery times.

A physical therapist can identify and improve range of motion, strength, stability and posture using scientifically validated strategies, procedures, and techniques. Yoga can provide the ‘psychological foundation’ for long term health and treatment and is a valuable adjunct to the evidence-based approach of physical therapy.

Depending upon the patient and their individual needs, yoga can be combined with skilled physical therapy. It is effective as a biofeedback tool to assist patients in monitoring and improving a sense of well-being.

As a combination, yoga and physical therapy can address an individual’s medical condition, injury or dysfunction. The result is improved body awareness and flexibility with a boost in balance and coordination

Is a combination therapy such as yoga and physical therapy is right for you? Our goal is the same as yours – to help you live a happy, healthy and productive life. Let’s use the most cutting edge science about human anatomy and function (physical therapy) and centuries worth of movement psychology (yoga) and find the plan that works best for you. Contact us today to learn more!

 

 

2812, 2018

Corrective Exercise is what you need now!

If you’ve been following my program or posts you know that I don’t just fix your injuries… I teach you how to prevent them by fixing your movements. Entering the “mainstream” this year is Corrective Exercise.

What is Corrective Exercise?

A corrective exercise by its simplest definition is a movement or exercise chosen to correct a specific dysfunction.

Good technique is the ultimate correction in exercise.

One common mistake is going to the gym and making sure you feel “worked” rather then taking the time to do things properly. This is a big mistake made by coaches and trainers when they’re trying to impress their clients rather then teach them proper movements.

If you do things properly – I’m positive you’ll see better results.

Likewise, if you take the time to learn how to perform certain movements correctly—which often involves regressing exercises to your current ability—you’ll not only see marked improvements in your overall performance, but also how you look and feel.

We can take a look at the squat for example. Are you doing the following:

  • Sitting back with the hips
  • Pushing the knees out
  • Letting the knees move forward slightly
  • Engaging the lats by pulling down on the bar
  • Not overarching the back
  • Finishing the movement with their glutes at the top

I promise, by fixing your movement you will get more power out of your movement, better glute activation and the results your looking for. You can watch my video on how to do a perfect squat on my YouTube channel.

Don’t skip activation!

Yes, that’s right. It takes 5-10 minutes to make sure those muscles are fired up and ready to go!

As always, feel free to contact me with any questions.

“We Help Fitness Enthusiasts Get Back To Their Workouts… Without Taking A Break, Slowing Down Or Seeing A Doctor.”

Mike Caisse, PT, DPT, CSCS, CertDN

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